Artificial intelligence makes smarter security

Sci-fi often portrays artificial intelligence (AI) like this: a computer watches people for a while, blinks darkly and decides the solution to the world’s problems is to kill off the human race. Thankfully we are far away from that. But what AI is capable of today is simulating a specific human brain function – such as pattern recognition. And that’s very exciting for security.

AI makes security practical in the open world
The world is now open, causing disruption in many industries and changing the demands on security.

Seeing cybercrime as a business helps to fuel new combat strategies

Picture Bob. He thinks he’s figured out how to avoid paying for cable TV by watching programs streamed from pirate websites. One day, he’s watching a live football broadcast and ten minutes into the game, he loses all access. His screen goes blank. Is ruining the user experience on pirated sites a new combat strategy?

Seeing it differently
Degrading user experience may not be the first thing that comes to mind when considering how to combat cybercrime.

Mobile has changed everything…except the security mindset?

Statistically every person in the world between 15 to 64 years old has a smartphone or tablet today. In the next 5 years for every baby born 10 smartphones will be sold1. Smartphones have literally changed our lives, from playing, working to everyday living. But what can we learn from app developers, who’ve made mobile devices so powerful?

Learning from app developers
With 102 billion mobile app downloads to date – averaging 22 apps per device2 – it’s clear that software developers know what they are doing.

Opening the door for a new era of payments

The EU Payment Service Directive (PSD2) aims to enhance consumer security, increase competition and create a single EU-wide market for payments. No doubt this market disruptive initiative opens the door for innovation. But will PSD2 inadvertently introduce more vulnerability for the cybercriminals to exploit?

Radical change
Achieving its aims all hinges on the banks sharing their customer data with anyone that holds the required license. This third party access to accounts (XS2A) ensures that banks cannot block the move to a new payment services market.

Fashioning a security solution with big data

A friend of mine once told me that software engineers are fashionistas at heart. Instead of trying to out dress each other they out buzz word each other. Well the latest buzz words you likely to hear on this season’s software engineering runway are Hadoop, Splunk and Deep learning.

Yes indeed these big data buzzwords have been flying around Irdeto for some time. Now you normally think of big data as being used to analyze consumer behavior or to learn that the breading patterns of toads are great predictors of earthquakes. But what has big data got to do with security?

“Securing” the consumer experience in Mobile Payments

According to Ovum, to support revenue growth banks need to focus on customer experience and production innovation. How can mobile payments help financial institutions re-engage with their consumers? And what role does security play in this?

Paying for something is the last thing anyone wants to do. What if it could be made into an experience – where you have, at least, the feeling of being in control of your finances or even getting rewarded for spending your hard earned cash? Mobile changes the banking experience.

Turning the Internet of Threats into the Internet of Trust

Could an innocent device like a STB, webcam or home thermostat be used by hackers to attack you? In the current world of the Internet of Things (IoT), the answer is Yes! Leading to the name Internet of Threats. But operators have the power to change this.

IoT promises connected convenience at consumer’s fingertips. From adjusting your home heating when you land back at the airport, to checking your home security remotely if the alarm goes off while you’re out. Consumers depend on their operator to be the trusted party and remove any privacy or security implications.

Tipping point of trust in mobile payments

Finally mobile payment is starting to take off. Yet, for it to become a true success story, establishing trust is paramount. The question is, is software security the hero or villain of this story?

How safe is it?
Security and fraud prevention concerns are key drivers in the slow uptake of mobile payments. Can someone else use my smart phone to make purchases?
Identity verification and device based authentication are the cornerstones for any mobile payment transaction.

Tackling the next-generation security challenge with credential management

Many aspects of our lives are dependent on credentials such as logins, passwords or pin codes. As technology continues to be more IP driven and the world more connected, how safe are these credentials that we rely on so much?

You are the target
Credit card numbers have limited value – more information is needed to target you. As Bloomberg highlights, attacks on medical records are increasing because the data is richer. Identity theft requires accessing systems which have more information about you.