Is Housejacking the next big threat to pay TV?

Cable companies, pay TV operators and telcos are often called service providers for the principal reason that they are not selling media and entertainment – they are selling a service. One of the most valuable assets they hold is a direct physical link into people’s homes and an ongoing monthly billing relationship.

From a pure business perspective that means anything a service provider can leverage to boost bandwidth usage and ARPU is fair game.

New IoT Security Bill is One Step Toward Fixing a Global Security Problem

IoT Security

A group of U.S. senators recently introduced a new bill (the ‘‘Internet of Things (IoT) Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2017’’) to address security vulnerabilities in connected devices. While this is a positive step toward improving baseline security for all devices bought and used by the government, it magnifies a much larger issue that is prevalent today in industries that are increasing their product’s connectivity to the Internet. Let me explain…

Making secure browsers a reality

Making secure browsers a reality

For the average consumer, hopping online to shop is as commonplace as physically going to the mall. No one thinks for a moment about how relatively unsafe it is to conduct business on the web. But in spite of our years’ long dependence on the web for commerce, it’s still astonishingly easy for cybercriminals to hack web-based transactions.

The reason? Web browsers. The fundamental insecurity of web browsers is arguably the weakest link in cyber security today.

Artificial intelligence makes smarter security

Sci-fi often portrays artificial intelligence (AI) like this: a computer watches people for a while, blinks darkly and decides the solution to the world’s problems is to kill off the human race. Thankfully we are far away from that. But what AI is capable of today is simulating a specific human brain function – such as pattern recognition. And that’s very exciting for security.

AI makes security practical in the open world
The world is now open, causing disruption in many industries and changing the demands on security.

Seeing cybercrime as a business helps to fuel new combat strategies

Picture Bob. He thinks he’s figured out how to avoid paying for cable TV by watching programs streamed from pirate websites. One day, he’s watching a live football broadcast and ten minutes into the game, he loses all access. His screen goes blank. Is ruining the user experience on pirated sites a new combat strategy?

Seeing it differently
Degrading user experience may not be the first thing that comes to mind when considering how to combat cybercrime.

Thinking differently about software security: Inside-Out

We live in a very different world today than we did 10-20 years ago. We’ve never been more connected. So, it’s surprising that software security practices remain in the realm of “We’ve always done it this way before”. Can they really expect to solve today’s security problems with an old way of thinking?

Traditional thinking
Traditional thinking typically starts with the premise that honest parties control the computer devices and any cryptographic operations are performed free from interference from would-be attackers. Given this, it’s probably understandable

Cryptography is everywhere in day-to-day life

Cryptography is no longer limited to the military and spies. This ancient art underpins modern life. It’s about encoding intelligible data, e.g. numbers, text and transforming them into something unreadable to anyone other than who the information is meant for. The question is, does it need an upgrade for today’s always connected world?

How secure is your house?
Hundreds of times a day we use cryptography in our everyday life. From the lock on the website that you’re browsing, remotely unlocking your car with the key fob to using all kinds of devices.

Mobile has changed everything…except the security mindset?

Statistically every person in the world between 15 to 64 years old has a smartphone or tablet today. In the next 5 years for every baby born 10 smartphones will be sold1. Smartphones have literally changed our lives, from playing, working to everyday living. But what can we learn from app developers, who’ve made mobile devices so powerful?

Learning from app developers
With 102 billion mobile app downloads to date – averaging 22 apps per device2 – it’s clear that software developers know what they are doing.