The role of AI in content protection

The threat of illegal content redistribution really cannot be underestimated. That’s the consensus from yesterday’s IBC Conference technical paper session on cyber and content security.

So let’s look at some facts – according to Irdeto data from late last year, there were more than 2.7 million advertisements on e-commerce websites, including Amazon, eBay and Alibaba for illicit content streaming devices.

Android conquered mobile, now how about TV?

Crossing the showfloor at IBC 2017 this week will be CTOs of telcos and pay TV providers from Europe and beyond, diligently investigating whether to deploy their service on Android TV. They would be in good company. As of mid-2017, Irdeto reports more than 20 well-known deployments around the world.

Undeniably part of the attraction is the middleware’s support for both broadcast and OTT services.

Seconds count in disrupting illegal live streaming

The hacking of HBO may have stolen the headlines recently, and the unauthorized script, tweets or leak of high value content is of clear concern. But the industry also continues to have revenues threatened on a daily basis from illegal premium live streams. Live sports is content that is among the most targeted, particularly top-tier football, but premium sports across the board are risk.

Take the Mayweather vs. McGregor fight…

Pay TV success should make a virtue of simplicity

Contrary to popular belief, pay TV remains remarkably robust across Europe and, according to analysts Futuresource Consulting, the reason why is the user experience.

In its latest ‘Living With Digital’ consumer research report, Futuresource states that across all major European territories, the most important reason given for continuing with a pay TV subscription was ease of use and a wide range of channels.

360-degree threats need a 360-degree security response

The media sector is now a top target for cyber criminals and combating these threats is a major focus at IBC. At midday today, the Conference takes aim at the problem, with a sold-out invite-only C-Tech Forum event which places security firmly at the top of executive agendas.

Perhaps the chief take-away is that the threat from piracy is multi-faceted…

Everyone loves public WiFi – particularly hackers!

Why should hackers rely on finding a zero-day or unpatched vulnerability? The most common way they break into accounts or networks is by stealing credentials. What’s more they’re easy to obtain.

How are credentials stolen?
Given our addiction to being ‘always connected’, it’s no surprise that WiFi based attacks are a fertile source of stolen credentials.

Is blockchain an accelerator of piracy?

There’s certainly hype around blockchain. Some believe that the distributed ledger and trustless consensus rules are revolutionary; with the potential to radically change existing business models. Yet, there’s also an association to a darker side. Will this innovative technology result in a proliferation of piracy?

One example of how business models could change is solutions like Livepeer.

2 sides of forensic watermarking

Forensic watermarking is an essential part of any anti-piracy program. The best approach is an end-2-end solution, combining watermarking technology with proactive detection and enforcement services. Yet we’re seeing a distinct split in how watermarking is implemented. Content owners and pay-media providers sometimes see things differently.

Both sides
Let’s start with the product.

Grow your OTT business despite credentials sharing

Sure, people share their Netflix – or your OTT service – user names and passwords with their buddies and families. Or their credentials get stolen and posted on the internet for illegal use. But is this a “solvable” problem, in the practical sense of the word? Or can you grow your OTT service despite credentials sharing?

Credentials sharing isn’t necessarily Darth Vader in the OTT galaxy
Trying to solve the “credentials sharing problem” is an impressive goal, but possibly a wasteful one and a diversion from the real problem – service abuse.