Cybercrime: the pros and cons

For the past 30 years, the growth in hacking has correlated directly with the proliferation of personal computing and mobile communication devices. And with the world now firmly in the digital age, concerns over “lone wolf” hackers have been re-focused on what are now resilient, complex and sophisticated crime organizations conducting global cyber attacks.
Of course, lone wolf attackers and small hacking groups still exist in every corner of the internet, often launching ransomware and Wi-Fi attacks, or implanting malware on PCs.

Learning lessons from the pay-media industry

What can the automotive industry learn from pay-media? They’re so different. For one personal safety is paramount and for the other it’s all about entertaining consumers. Worlds apart? Not at all when it comes to cybercrime. For cybercrime these differences don’t matter.

Starting out
Just as the internet plays a pivotal role in the media industry, its growing in importance for automotive.

When hacking turns bad

What if I told you the Internet was built by hackers or that Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has been called a hacker. Would you believe me? To fully understand the hacking threat, first we should know more about the hacking mind.

The hacking mind
Although predominately associated with the online world the hacking mindset is not limited to those in the computer field. The characteristics can be equally found in the world of art or science.