2 sides of forensic watermarking

Forensic watermarking is an essential part of any anti-piracy program. The best approach is an end-2-end solution, combining watermarking technology with proactive detection and enforcement services. Yet we’re seeing a distinct split in how watermarking is implemented. Content owners and pay-media providers sometimes see things differently.

Both sides
Let’s start with the product.

A successful pirate raid combines investigative skills and teamwork

Pirates know what sells in their market. While content redistribution over the internet is a major global problem, we shouldn’t overlook control word sharing. In Africa, this is still a highly profitable business for pirates. Well, until they’re raided and sentenced that is!

Setting the scene
As part of a long running investigation working with Multichoice Africa Limited (MAL), a cybercrime syndicate was identified in Egypt.

Is the tide turning against online pirates?

Pirates move at internet speed. Unhindered by rules and regulations they continually adapt; leaving the content owners, media industry and legal institutions to play catchup. My earlier blog highlighted 3 initiatives in the fight against piracy , and in the last month or so there are more examples of how the tide might be starting to turn against the pirates.

European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling
Recently, the ECJ ruled on a long running case between BREIN (the Dutch anti-piracy group) and Filmspeler.nl, that selling streaming devices preloaded with pirate streaming links and add-ons is illegal.

Can site blocking help fight online piracy?

With the proliferation of different ways to access pirated content, does site blocking have any impact? That was a question I received during a recent piracy panel discussion. Let’s have a look to see if it does.

What is it?

Put simply, site blocking is a technical means by which Internet Service Providers (ISPs) can disable consumer access to target sites. This can be by using DNS based -, Url- or IP blocking capabilities.

Collaboration is critical for a successful raid against online pirates

Gone are the days where online piracy was an individual sharing illegal content with a few select “friends”. Today, online piracy is a highly sophisticated operation that often spans different countries and jurisdictions. To be effective in fighting this continually growing threat requires a team of experts.

Pre-match build up
OTT piracy remains the biggest threat facing pay-media operators and content rights holders. Illegal supply of premium content, especially live events such as soccer is driving this increase.

What will it take for the media industry to unite against online pirates?

The availability of high quality content and broadband access becoming the norm is making online pirates’ lives a lot easier. Content owners, sports rights holders and operators are taking steps to address this problem. But is it enough to have the impact needed to curb the rising tide of piracy?

Disruption affecting studios
Studio’s revenue comes not only from box office performance but also from a complex system of staggered releases…

Consumer piracy survey insights for pay-media operators

The Irdeto global consumer piracy survey is the largest ever conducted. With over 25,000 adults across 30 countries participating, it provides unique insight into the dynamics of online piracy. Comparing the youngest age group (18-24) and the oldest group (over 55) we can see the differences but also some surprising similarities.

There’s lots that we can pull from the extensive data, but let’s just focus on a couple of angles.

Signs you’re being out-marketed by the online pirates

I’m sure Hubspot’s Brian Halligan was addressing legal companies when he said: “The only way to be successful in growing your business and revenue streams is to match how you market your products with the way in which the prospective clients are learning about and shopping for the products.” Yet, online pirates have definitely taken his message to heart. Have you?
Connecting with your consumers
It’s clear just looking around, we’re addicted to being online. Just as technology has made the world more connected, it’s also increased the number of places consumers are hit with marketing messages.

Will content ever be ‘everywhere’?

After lots of meetings with studios and operators at CES, a memory popped into my head. “Making camel-friendly packaging”. What on earth does that have to do with content?

Back in the day
I was a product manager for STBs. Our best distributor from Dubai faxed over (yes, it’s that long ago) a complaint. Too much packaging was negatively affecting his pipeline. How?