Giving live sports piracy the red card

For live sports, speed is the name of the game when it comes to fighting online pirates. After all the value of the sports content is at its highest while it is being broadcast. What’s the winning game plan to get the pirates sent off as soon as possible?

Live sports broadcasts attract a lot of eyeballs and big advertising dollars. It’s not surprising then that they are a primary target for pirate services.

A changing attitude towards watermarking

Watermarking is not new. The technology, which embeds an invisible unique mark to identify the source of pirated content, has been around for a while. Critics have said it was a solution looking for a problem. Well look no more.

Technology vendors like Irdeto have sold watermarking solutions over the years, mainly to content owners wishing to identify leaks in the distribution channel. This is changing.

Kodi: latest vehicle for online piracy

As Richard Branson said “Business opportunities are like buses. There’s always another coming along.” Looking at the online piracy world, the latest bus is exploiting software media centers. And unfortunately, many consumers are being taken for a ride.

I’ve mentioned it before, online pirates are undoubtedly criminals. Yet they’re also entrepreneurs. The pirates are continually adapting. To effectively fight online piracy means keeping up to date with their latest activities.

Is OTT piracy the online equivalent of Japanese knotweed?

True, a botanical metaphor about OTT piracy is unusual. But similarities can be drawn. In the housing market, the presence of Japanese knotweed can have a detrimental effect. If unchecked, online piracy is on track to do the same in the pay-media industry. What can be done to fight the weed?

What is Japanese knotweed?
Put simply, it’s a relentless plant that can grow 30cm a week. Its invasion can knock thousands off the value

The DarkNet and its role in online piracy

Thanks to the highly publicized sentencing of Ross Ulbricht, founder of the online blackmarket place – Silk Road, the general awareness of the DarkNet is increasing. Yet, the importance of the DarkNet to our customers isn’t about supply of illegal drugs or fake passports; it is its growing role in evolving online piracy.

What’s what?
Before diving into the detail of the emerging trends that we’re seeing, let’s start by putting things into context.

Piracy Lounge reveals the secrets of the online pirates

It may sound strange coming from the SVP Sales & Marketing but…. Sometimes it’s not about “always closing” – it’s about raising awareness. And that’s certainly true when it comes to the growing online piracy problem.

Headline grabbing
Piracy levels surrounding the season 5 premier of Game of Thrones™ received global news coverage. The Irdeto piracy data, used by the press, showed that new season premiers increase piracy activity, both of old episodes and the new season.

Disruption is the name of the game when it comes to piracy

The harsh reality is we can’t eradicate online piracy. But what we can do is make it as difficult as possible for the pirates. Without an effective supply chain a business will struggle to give consumers what they want. And that’s no different for the pirates!

Where would you go? The biggest, of course!
On a typical day, there are approximately 1.9million product listings for pirate OTT devices and services available for purchase through major online retailers. Unfortunately piracy is a lucrative business.

Confident your content is safe from pirates? Think again!

There is no doubt about it, pirates are criminals. Unfortunately they are also entrepreneurs. They know that high quality, compelling content offered at a reasonable price sells! As such all legal content – thematic channels, recent movie releases, and particularly live sport – is a target. Unless investments are protected, content is not safe.

More and more are out there
As you know from my earlier post , we are facing a wave of piracy larger than ever before.

Who’s responsible for fighting online piracy?

As you know from my earlier post, we’re facing a wave of piracy bigger than we’ve ever seen before. OTT piracy – aka content redistribution – is today’s biggest threat. But is it down to the pay-TV operators or content rights holders to take on this fight?

A common enemy
There’s no doubt about it. Online pirates are bad for business. Pay-TV operators are facing potential subscriber churn to cheaper illegal services. For content rights holders this is an emerging threat affecting loss of revenue as these alternative sources are diluting the value of the content.