Increase in Piracy During Pandemic Lockdown

During the COVID-19 pandemic, daily life has gone digital. People are seeking innovative ways of staying connected and entertained while remaining safe at home. Puzzles, toys, and game sales have surged. Unfortunately, piracy is also on the rise. As the world economy gradually reopens, pirates will continue to take advantage of increased demand for new content. Protecting content from piracy will be crucial to mitigating revenue loss during this unprecedented time.

The role of AI in content protection

The threat of illegal content redistribution really cannot be underestimated. That’s the consensus from yesterday’s IBC Conference technical paper session on cyber and content security.

So let’s look at some facts – according to Irdeto data from late last year, there were more than 2.7 million advertisements on e-commerce websites, including Amazon, eBay and Alibaba for illicit content streaming devices.

Collaboration is critical for a successful raid against online pirates

Gone are the days where online piracy was an individual sharing illegal content with a few select “friends”. Today, online piracy is a highly sophisticated operation that often spans different countries and jurisdictions. To be effective in fighting this continually growing threat requires a team of experts.

Pre-match build up
OTT piracy remains the biggest threat facing pay-media operators and content rights holders. Illegal supply of premium content, especially live events such as soccer is driving this increase.

Are online pirates your invisible competition?

We all know the pay-media world is changing. Old business models are under pressure. Digital viewing habits are relegating TV to the 2nd screen. Industry experts all talk about who will triumph in this flux. One ‘brand’ which you rarely see as a serious contender: Online Pirates. But why not?

The usual suspects
Never before have consumers had so much affordable content so easily accessible. The technology advancements opened the door for OTT providers and content owners to go direct to consumers.

Is OTT piracy the online equivalent of Japanese knotweed?

True, a botanical metaphor about OTT piracy is unusual. But similarities can be drawn. In the housing market, the presence of Japanese knotweed can have a detrimental effect. If unchecked, online piracy is on track to do the same in the pay-media industry. What can be done to fight the weed?

What is Japanese knotweed?
Put simply, it’s a relentless plant that can grow 30cm a week. Its invasion can knock thousands off the value