2 sides of forensic watermarking

Forensic watermarking is an essential part of any anti-piracy program. The best approach is an end-2-end solution, combining watermarking technology with proactive detection and enforcement services. Yet we’re seeing a distinct split in how watermarking is implemented. Content owners and pay-media providers sometimes see things differently.

Both sides
Let’s start with the product.

What lessons can pay-media operators learn from online retail?

With consumers as the common denominator, it’s not surprising that similarities can be seen across some industries. In the media industry, the need for change to keep up with changing consumer demand is widely accepted. But what is the formula for success? Can any parallels be drawn with online retail?

Online’s disruptive nature
It was a Forbes article that made me think: ‘The inconvenient truth about e-commerce: it’s largely unprofitable’. It explains that e-commerce has been disruptive. The radical shift online is presenting challenges

Consumer piracy survey insights for pay-media operators

The Irdeto global consumer piracy survey is the largest ever conducted. With over 25,000 adults across 30 countries participating, it provides unique insight into the dynamics of online piracy. Comparing the youngest age group (18-24) and the oldest group (over 55) we can see the differences but also some surprising similarities.

There’s lots that we can pull from the extensive data, but let’s just focus on a couple of angles.

MPEG DASH: The fast lane to reducing cost

Operating a pay TV service used to be (relatively) simple: encode your content, then encrypt and deliver it with a key over closed networks to set top boxes. But the road to a TV Everywhere offering is much more difficult, with roadblocks driving up total cost of ownership.

A tricky road to TV Everywhere
There are many barriers to combining pay media services on broadcast and OTT. Content now has to be encoded, encrypted and stored in multiple resolutions, using different containers and DRM combinations.

Will the TV ever replace the STB?

Despite ongoing predictions of cord cutting/shaving, STBs still securely deliver pay-TV content into the majority of homes. But TVs are becoming smarter by the day and device manufacturers would rather sell a new TV than a “cheap” STB. This is not new, but will this year be the one when the big screen wants a bigger role?

What would it take?
In essence the TV would need to take over all of the duties performed by the STB.

Fighting online piracy requires collaboration

Online piracy is a highly sophisticated operation that often spans different countries and jurisdictions. Trying to tackle this on your own will have limited effect. To have an impact means working together.

Hare and the tortoise
Online piracy is one of the biggest threats facing pay-media providers and content owners. It’s a growing pandemic problem and not easy to solve. Pirates are continually adapting. Unhindered by rules and regulations they move at internet speed.

Will the real pay-media disruptor please stand up?

Just in time for 2017 predictions about the pay-media industry. Typically, there’s always something about disruptors. But let’s be frank, so far the so-called disruptors haven’t brought the industry to its knees. Isthe industry too resilient or is the real disruptor yet to make an entrance?

What got me thinking
Last Sunday, after a pleading text from my student son I transferred money to his account. It took 26 seconds to reach his account!

The anti-piracy enforcement toolbox

Would you use a screwdriver to hammer a nail into a wall? Not very effective. It’s the wrong tool for the job. The same is true in the world of anti-piracy. You need the right tools and services for the different threats.

Understanding what you need
Online pirates are continually adapting. Unhindered by rules and regulations pirates move at internet speed. Too effectively fight online piracy means keeping up to date with their latest activities.

Looking at the role of CA today and in the future

Pay-TV operators have used CA since the 1990s to encrypt digital content. Over the years, CA has evolved, with Irdeto launching the first software based card-less CA in 2011. But does the CA technology still have a role to play going forward?

Looking back
CA started life in the analogue broadcast world. Its role was to scramble the video signal. With the evolution to digital broadcast, CA transformed to what you can call “true” conditional access with encryption.

What’s the secret to consumer choice in the online media world?

Some say that we are living in a new era of Television, I think that is true. Consumers have an ever expanding choice of content to view. And in today’s connected world, they have a wide array of channels, devices and apps at their disposal to watch their favorite program at any time and on any device. But how do incumbent pay-TV operators keep up?

No choice but to deliver
If the consumer can’t get what they want, they look elsewhere, and elsewhere is quite often the illegal alternatives.