Consolidation: what the press release doesn’t tell you

Consolidation within the media industry shows no sign of stopping. It’s happening on both sides: vendors and customers. When it comes to security vendor consolidation why is it important to look beyond the press release?

The beat goes on
Hearing about vendor consolidation or rumored consolidation is common place. It’s part and parcel of our industry.

A common goal for all pay-TV operators

With the rise of OTT services, consumers are starting to analyze their monthly entertainment expenses. The good news is that many don’t want to lose their pay-TV operator service. The downside is they want to pay less for it.

Is it the same across the globe?
What’s clear from my customer meetings is that pay-TV services are not being eroded completely by OTT. They’re still important. But pressure is building on operators to drive down the cost of delivery. From Mexico to Malaysia this was a common goal.

The 5 core characteristics operators value when working together

One of the things I love about this industry is that it’s constantly evolving. I believe the media industry is at the cusp of some of the most significant and rapid change we’ve seen in decades. And we are already seeing the early opportunities that this new paradigm brings.

Not losing focus
Consolidation within the industry shows no sign of stopping; most recently Charter’s planned acquisition of TimeWarner as well as Arris|Pace merging.

“Securing” the consumer experience in Mobile Payments

According to Ovum, to support revenue growth banks need to focus on customer experience and production innovation. How can mobile payments help financial institutions re-engage with their consumers? And what role does security play in this?

Paying for something is the last thing anyone wants to do. What if it could be made into an experience – where you have, at least, the feeling of being in control of your finances or even getting rewarded for spending your hard earned cash? Mobile changes the banking experience.

Turning the Internet of Threats into the Internet of Trust

Could an innocent device like a STB, webcam or home thermostat be used by hackers to attack you? In the current world of the Internet of Things (IoT), the answer is Yes! Leading to the name Internet of Threats. But operators have the power to change this.

IoT promises connected convenience at consumer’s fingertips. From adjusting your home heating when you land back at the airport, to checking your home security remotely if the alarm goes off while you’re out. Consumers depend on their operator to be the trusted party and remove any privacy or security implications.

Tackling the next-generation security challenge with credential management

Many aspects of our lives are dependent on credentials such as logins, passwords or pin codes. As technology continues to be more IP driven and the world more connected, how safe are these credentials that we rely on so much?

You are the target
Credit card numbers have limited value – more information is needed to target you. As Bloomberg highlights, attacks on medical records are increasing because the data is richer. Identity theft requires accessing systems which have more information about you.

How safe is your STB?

Cybercrime is big business. And the impact is far reaching. No organization is immune. Cable and Satellite operators with their large number of STBs could be vulnerable to attack. Can anything be done to minimize the risk?

Changing face of cybercrime
Hackers are no longer teenagers wanting to gain notoriety. Over the years, we’ve witnessed cybercrime change.

Break free – hand off complexity to focus on your core business

Consolidation within the industry shows no sign of stopping. The EU approves BSkyB’s proposed acquisition of Sky Deutschland and Sky Italia. Vodafone CEO hints at interest in more acquisitions after its recent purchase of Spain’s largest cable operator – Ono. And that’s only a couple of examples. You would image that the inevitable consequence for the “mega” operator is the headache of being locked into multiple long-term vendors.

A recent customer meeting reassured me that operators are interested in breaking free. They just need the headache tablet.